Revival Accounts 4

From A History of the 1859 Ulster Revival

Now the movement in Ulster—preceded, as has been shown, by an increasing circulation of the Scriptures—gave a mighty impulse—

To the preaching of the Word—It was indeed a times of sowing beside all waters; of setting before men death and life, the blessing and the curse; and as the language of strong feelings is usually brief and pointed, such was very much the style of address induced by the movement.

To the hearing of the Word—As the Gospel was fully, faithfully, and earnestly preached, so it was gladly waited upon. The Word was precious in those days. Day after day, and night after night, multitudes both of men and women—many of them infirm and delicate, and most of them dependent for subsistence upon the labour of their hands—were willing to forego amusement, to forsake their callings and employments, to lack sleep, to deny themselves of their necessary food, and to pass whole nights under the open canopy of heaven, if they might only hear of Jesus! And just in proportion to the fullness with which Christ and Him crucified was set forth—just in proportion to the faithfulness of the heard of the Cross in proclaiming—Ruin by the fall, Redemption by Christ, and regeneration by the Holy Ghost, did they open their mouths wide and pant earnestly for the preaching of the Word.

Now the revival wave carried the conversation of professing Christians—for the time being, at least—far above the ordinary level. And not only did it accomplish this, but it changed for the time, even amongst those who made no profession of religion, the subjects of conversation. The language of Psalm 126 affords an illustration of the results produced in regard to both classes. The ungodly had their mouths opened to speak of the Lord’s doings, in wonder and astonishment—“They said among the heathen, The Lord hath done great things for them.” The godly had their mouths opened to speak of the doings of the Lord also, not, however, in wonder and astonishment at something heard or seen merely, but in gratitude and thankfulness, moreover, for what they had themselves experienced.

RS Notes:

1. The Gospel must be proclaimed, but not what is widely thought of as the gospel in the modern day. The Gospel of Christ and Him crucified has some necessary teachings that go with it. “And just in proportion to the fullness with which Christ and Him crucified was set forth—just in proportion to the faithfulness of the heard of the Cross in proclaiming—Ruin by the fall, Redemption by Christ, and regeneration by the Holy Ghost, did they open their mouths wide and pant earnestly for the preaching of the Word.”

2. The Gospel cannot truly be proclaimed apart from teaching these things:
That men are ruined by the fall.
That redemption is accomplished by Christ and Christ alone, but how He did that.
That regeneration is by the Holy Spirit and how He does that.

3. It is when the Gospel is preached (in its fullness and its corresponding teachings) that men begin to listen
to preaching and it comes to them in power.

4. It is when the Gospel is preached that hearts are changed and people turn from the vain things of the world but also things that are necessary in this world in order to hear and have Christ.

5. It is when the glory of Christ in the Gospel is proclaimed that people turn from their amusements and want to have conversations about Christ.

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